The missing link

As more and more people live in cities, the need for natural spaces and landscapes has become a self-evident truth. The search for greenery or the longing for ‘greenification’ (like the Dutch put it) is intensifying but not fast enough to catch up with urban expansion and the rise of towers.


There is no denial that the concept of sustainability is acknowledged in most global cities with initiatives, strategies and objectives (although often on paper) integrated into larger plans. We grow accustomed to seeing parks, rooftop gardens, vertical walls and other green technological advances, which are all contributing to the making of a responsible urban environment.

Source: http://www.spowers.com.au/60l-building-carlton-victoria/
Source: http://www.whitehat.com.au/melbourne/Environment/ESDM.asp
However, what we call nature is merely the result of human intervention. Melbourne’s natural landscape itself was man shaped, as is apparent from the creation of two islands in the Yarra River.
“Measures such as sky gardens or vertical greenery leave a veneer of green, but don’t create the spaces needed for interesting encounters with nature.” said landscape architect Andrew Grant.
So how can people feel good in a city? Are human beings able to connect and be inspired by an urban landscape or is it time to truly reconnect people with nature? Some suggest that we are able to go beyond these elegant landscaped facades and let the wilderness take over what was once its own.

Source: www.dezeen.com/2011/05/08/garden-of-10000-bridges-by-west-8/
Source: www.dezeen.com/2011/05/08/garden-of-10000-bridges-by-west-8/

Source: http://www.shutterstock.com/pic-211889308/stock-photo-singapore-skyline-of-business-district-and-marina-bay-in-day-foreground-with-lotus-pond
Can we create an emotional bridge between people and cities?




Banner source: www.doubledialogues.com/

0 comments:

Post a Comment